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Conference description

Lorine Niedecker links

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This celebration has been made possible by the following contributors:
Anonymous (NFR)
Wisconsin Humanities Council
Wisconsin Arts Board
Milwaukee Arts Board
Fort Atkinson Community Foundation
Kohler Foundation
Brico Fund
Franke Idea Fund

with additional support from:
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
W.D. Hoard and Company
Midwest Airline Center
Mary (Kit) Basquin

and special thanks to:
Woodland Pattern Board and staff members, whose enthusiasm and support helped make this conference possible.
1903-1970 Lorine Niedecker Centenary
Conference Presenters

Programs will address Niedecker's art and legacy through tributes, panel discussions, scholarly talks, performances of LN's work, and readings by attending writers.

Karen Anderson
Rae Armantrout
Bob Arnold
Jane Augustine
Martha Bergland
Peter Campion
David Charbonneau
Thomas A. Clark
Cathy Cook
William Corbett
Cid Corman
Michael Davidson
Steve Dickison
Susan Dunn
Rachel Blau DuPlessis
Ron Ellis
Theodore Enslin
Lisa Fishman
Kathleen Fraser
Gloria Frym
Karl Gartung
Michael Golston
Arielle Greenberg
Jonathan Greene
Sue Hartwick
Paul G. Hayes
Michael Heller
Brook Houglum
Kimberly Howey
Jonathan Ivry
Lisa Jarnot
Ruth Jennison
John Lehman
Amy Lutzke
Richard Meier
Peter Middleton
Pat Moran
Mark Nowak
Maureen Owen
Michael Ondaatje
Jenny Penberthy
Mary Pinard
Patrick Pritchett
Meredith Quartermain
Peter Quartermain
Lisa Robertson
Elizabeth Robinson
Bonnie Roub
Lisa Samuels
Giles Scott
Eleni Sikelianos
Jonathan Skinner
Stacy Szymaszek
Harriet Tarlo
Steve Timm
Anne Waldman
Peter Whalen
Elizabeth Willis


 
Karen Anderson

Karen Anderson grew up in Connecticut and received her B.A. from McGill University. A recipient of a Rotary Scholarship for studying in New Zealand, she is a 1998 graduate of the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop who has had work published in the Indiana Review, The New Republic, Fence, Sycamore Review, Pleiades, Third Coast, Columbia, Volt, Colorado Review, Sonora Review, and Poetry Ireland Review. She currently lives in Ithaca, New York and is a Ph.D. student in English at Cornell University.


 
Rae Armantrout

Rae Armantrout is Adjunct Professor of Literature at the University of California at San Diego and the author of six books of poetry, most recently Veil: New and Selected Poems (Wesleyan University Press, 2001) and The Pretext (Green Interger, 2001). Recognized internationally as one of the most original poets of the last decade, her work incorporates elements of both a close observation of the world around er and a witty play of linguistic and syntactical elements.

Fred Muratori wrote in Electronic Poetry Review: "...few poets have made carers of gnawing at our assumptions about reality...with the uncanny brilliance of Rae Armantrout" and Robert Creeley said of her new book Veil, "Wit like the proverbial razor, clarity a shimmer of glass, these poems make truth a simple matter, elegant, wistful—forever."


 
Bob Arnold

Bob Arnold was born and raised in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts. While employed as a stone builder and landscaper, his books of poetry have appeared since 1974. He is the editor and publisher of Longhouse. For many years he has made a home in Vermont with his wife Susan and their son Carson.

"Bob Arnold builds stone walls. He also builds poems that will last for generations and as natural as stones working together. Edwin Muir once remarked that modern poetry is not read by "the people," because it no longer tells a story. "The people" should reconsider...
Oyster Boy Review 13 (Summer 2001)


 
Jane Augustine

Jane Augustine is a poet and scholar whose most recent poetry collections are Arbor Vitae (Marsh Hawk Press, 2002) and Transitory (Spuyten Duyvil, 2002). She has written about Lorine Niedecker since 1975 and has published numerous essays on Niedecker, H.D. and other modern women writers. Women's studies courses still use her much-anthologized story "Secretive" (1977). She edited The Gift by H.D.: The Complete Text (UP Florida, 1998) and has held the H.D. Fellowship at Beinecke Library, Yale, as well as two Fellowships in Poetry from the New York Foundation on the Arts.


 
Martha Bergland

Martha Bergland's first novel, A Farm Under A Lake, was published in 1989 by Graywolf Press, and subsequently by Vintage Books, Bloomsbury in England, Bonniers in Sweden, and Krueger in Germany. Graywolf published her novel Idle Curiosity in 1997. Bergland's essays, poems, and short stories are widely published in literary journals. Her short story "An Embarrassment of Ordinary Riches" was awarded a Pushcart Prize. Bergland taught English for many years at Milwaukee Area Technical College.


 
Peter Campion

Peter Campion's poems and prose have appeared or are forthcoming in AGNI, Jacket, Literary Imagination, Poetry, Raritan, The San Francisco Chronicle, Slate and other journals. His essay on Lorine Niedecker and George Oppen appeared last year in PN Review, where he has also published an essay on James Schuyler. He is a Jones Lecturer in Poetry at Stanford. He has also taught at San Francisco University and Boston University. He lives in Berkeley.


 
David Charbonneau

David Charbonneau received his Ph.D.in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2003. His dissertation is entitled, "Finding the Middle Ground: Midwestern Poetry, 1930-2003," and includes a chapter on the work of Niedecker. He has presented on Lorine Niedecker at the conference on Regional Literatures at Minnesota State University at Mankato. He is originally from Illinois.


 
Thomas A. Clark

Thomas A. Clark was born in Greenock in 1944 and lived in Nailsworth, Gloucestershire until 2002. In recent years, the different landscapes of the Highlands and Islaneds have been the central preoccupation of his poetry. Between 1986 and 2002, with the artist Laurie Clark, he directed Cairn Gallery, one of the earliest and most respected of 'artist-run spaces', specializing in conceptual, minimal and land art. His most recent publications include One Hundred Scottish Places (October, 1999) and Distance and Proximity (Morning Star Publications, 2000) and numerous small books and cards from his Moschatel Press. "Stay with the one thing, give it some space or time, if its worth noticing at all, before hurrying on to the next thing: that is what I've always felt about poetry. It's a question of the space around each perception rather than glamourous production."


 
Cathy Cook

Cathy Cook has made over 20 short experimental films & videos over the last 20 years. Cook has exhibited her award winning work extensively in both solo and group shows including MOMA and the Whitney Museum. In 2001, Cook was awarded a Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. In addition, she received fellowships and grants from New York State Council of the Arts, Experimental Television Center, The Jerome Foundation (Film in the Cities) and Wisconsin Arts Board. Cook's media works are in the permanent collection of the Donnell Library (NYC), Princeton University, National Library of Australia (Canberra), NYU Film Library, among others. Currently Cook is creating a short experimental film that explores her responses to the poetic works of Lorine Niedecker and will be screening an excerpt of the film in progress at the conference.


 
William Corbett

William Corbett is Writer-in-Residence at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a poet, memoirist and art critic whose books include New and Selected Poems (Zoland Books, 1995), Boston Vermont (Zoland Books, 1999), Furthering My Education (Zoland Books, 1997), Philip Guston's Late Work: A Memoir (Zoland Books, 1994), and All Prose (Zoland Books, 2001). He is currently editing Just The Thing: The Selected Letters of James Schuyler. He lives in Boston's South End and is an editor of the magazine Pressed Wafer, a small press that publishes poetry.


 
Cid Corman

Cid Corman was born in Boston in 1924, and received his B.A. from Tufts. He did graduate work at the University of Michigan, where he won the Hopwood Award for Poetry, and the University of North Carolina. In 1950-51 Corman begain editing and publishing a little magazine called Origin which featured his own works and those of his contemporaries including Robert Creeley, Robert Duncan, Larry Eigner, Denise Levertov, William Bronk, Charles Olson, Louis Zukofsky, and Paul Blackburn. In 1954 Corman went to Europe on a Fulbright Grant and studied at the Sorbonne in France. He later moved to Japan where his output, in addition to his own poetry and editing work, included translations of the works of Japanese poets. Corman has published over seventy volumes of poetry, translated several French and Japanese poets, and published four volumes of essays. He has lived in Kyoto, Japan since 1958 where he and his wife run a business, Cid Corman's Dessert Shop. Corman is one of "late" modernism's most significant enablers, a poet of talent himself, and a master of "production" -- whose work, both as poet and publisher, is intertwined with the Objectivists Zukofsky and Oppen, as well as Creeley and Olson.


 
Michael Davidson

Michael Davidson is the author of eight volumes of poetry and three books of criticism, the most recent being Guys Like Us: Citing Masculinity in Cold War Culture (2003, University of Chicago Press). He has received a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Award, two California Council for the Humanities Public Policy Grants, and two Fund for Poetry Awards. He is now a professor of literature at the University of California at San Diego.


 
Steve Dickison

Steve Dickison is Executive Director of The Poetry Center & American Poetry Archives, a position he's held since August 1999. He has 15 years experience in non-profit literary arts management and an intimate working knowledge of the full breadth of contemporary literary writing and publishing. Steve Dickison is also a poet, and editor-publisher of the award-winning small press Listening Chamber. He has presented talks and seminars on literary publishing before the Modern Language Association, American Booksellers Association, the Naropa Institute, California College of Arts and Crafts, et al. Recent writings appear in Recovery of the Public World: Essays on Poetics in Honour of Robin Blaser (Talonbooks, Vancouver, 1999), and the magazines Crayon, 26, Shuffle Boil, and Fourteen Hills, where he interviews Objectivist poet Carl Rakosi.


 
Susan Dunn

Originally from Chicago, Susan E. Dunn studied at Reed College, University of Illinois and University of Wisconsin-Madison where she received her Ph.D. in English. Her dissertation investigated avant-garde aesthetics and the writings of Mina Loy and she continues to work on this as well as other explorations of the modern lyric. In addition to literary criticism she writes poetry and fiction and she is working on a collection of essays on animals in literature, art and science. Until recently, she was the Associate Director of the Stanford Humanities Center. She is currently a Lecturer in English and American Studies at Stanford University.


 
Rachel Blau DuPlessis

Two books by Rachel Blau DuPlessis appeared in 2001: the first parts of her long poem project, Drafts 1-38, Toll (Wesleyan University Press) and her critical work, Genders, Races, and Religious Cultures in Modern American Poetry, 1908-1934 (Cambridge University Press). In 2002, she received a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, and she was awarded the Roy Harvey Pearce / Archive for New Poetry Prize for a significant lifetime contribution to American poetry and literary scholarship. She is also the author of The Pink Guitar: Writing as Feminist Practice (Routledge, 1990) and the editor of The Selected Letters of George Oppen (Duke, 1990), as well as other works. DuPlessis teaches at Temple University in Philadelphia in the English Department and the Creative Writing Program.


 
Ron Ellis

R. Virgil (Ron) Ellis lives near Cambridge, Wisconsin. He is Associate Editor of Rosebud magazine as well as its art director and web author. He has most recently placed poems with Switched-on Gutenberg: A Global Poetry Journal, WordWrights, New Works Review, new digressions, Recursive Angel, 2River View, The Wolf Head Quarterly, The Lucid Stone, and Mississippi Review Web. He is the author of The Blue Train and The Tenting Cantos. His albums of performance poetry include the six-CD set entitled The Rough Cuts Series, and the albums Open My Eyes, Lunar Crescent Wrench, Dangerous Odds, The Andro Poems: A Rock Cantata, and Selected Tenting Cantos (in progress).


 
Theodore Enslin

Enslin's first book, The Work Proposed, was published in 1958 on Cid Corman's Origin Press. Since then, he has written over seventy books, many of which are out of print. Enslin's poetry has been identified with Objectivist writers Louis Zukofsky, Lorine Niedecker, and George Oppen. Musicality, nature, landscape, and observation of daily existence inhabit his writing. In 1999 National Poetry Foundation published Then, and Now: Selected Poems 1943-1993, the first comprehensive selection of Enslin's work. In addition, he has three books of recent work forthcoming: Nine (National Poetry Foundation), a collection of nine sequences from 1994-1999, Ring (St. Andrews College Press), and Keep Sake. He chooses to work outside of the academy, living in rural, coastal Maine.


 
Lisa Fishman

Lisa Fishman is the author of DEAR, READ, which was selected by Brenda Hillman for publication on Ahsahta Press (2002). Her first book, The Deep Heart's Core is a Suitcase, was published by New Issues Press (1996). Her poems appear in recent issues of Colorado Review, American Letters and Commentary, Elixir, and elsewhere. She teaches at Beloit College.


 
Kathleen Fraser

Kathleen Fraser is the author of twelve books of poetry, including two letterpress collaborations with artists Sam Francis and Mary Ann Hayden. She has taught at the Iowa Writers Workshop, Reed College, The Naropa Institute and San Francisco State University where she was professor of Creative Writing from 1972 to 1992. She founded the American Poetry Archives during her directorship of The Poetry Center at SFSU. From 1983 through 1991, Kathleen Fraser published and edited the groundbreaking journal HOW(ever), focusing on innovative/exploratory work by English-language women poets. She is a Guggenheim Fellow in Poetry and has received an NEA Poetry Fellowship and the NEA Young Writers Award. Kathleen currently splits her year between San Francisco and Rome.


 
Gloria Frym

Gloria Frym is the author of two critically acclaimed collections of short stories—Distance No Object (City Lights Books) and How I Learned (Coffee House Books)—as well as several volumes of poetry, including By Ear (Sun & Moon Press), and Back to Earth (The Figures). Her most recent book of poems, Homeless at Home (Creative Arts Book Company), won an American Book Award in 2002. Frym has served as guest lecturer at Scripps College in Claremont, CA; the American Embassy Cultural Centers in Nagoya and Kyoto, Japan; Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado and the Chautauqua Institution in New York. She now teaches in the MFA/BA Writing and Literature Programs at California College of the Arts and in spring 2004, will serve as Distinguished Writer in Residence at St. Mary's College in Moraga, California.


 
Karl Gartung

Karl Gartung is a founding member of Woodland Pattern, which incorporated in 1979 and its Artistic Director. He has worked as a construction roofer, a gandy dancer, a salesman for agricultural equipment,and Director of Literary Events at Boox/Books in Milwaukee. He is currently a driver for Emory Worldwide Consolidated Freight where he also serves as union shop steward. Gartung has designed theater sets for productions in Michigan, Nebraska and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He is a voracious reader and explorer of information and has served on literary panels for the Wisconsin Arts Board.


 
Michael Golston

Michael Golston has recently moved from the Bay Area to New York, where he is assistant professor at Columbia University, specializing in 20th century poetry and poetics. He has published articles on Clark Coolidge, p. inman, Ezra Pound, and more general issues of poetic form, and has essays appearing soon on Louis Zukofsky and William Carlos Williams. He is currently finishing a book on ideology and rhythm in modernist poetry.


 
Arielle Greenberg

Arielle Greenberg was born in Ohio and has lived in New York and Israel. She holds a BA in literature (with a concentration in film and drama studies) from SUNY Purchase College and an MFA in creative writing (poetry) and CAS in women's studies from Syracuse University. She is the author of Given, a collection of poems. Her poems have appeared in many journals, including the Denver Quarterly, Crazyhorse, Fence, Volt, American Letters & Commentary, Pleiades, jubilat, CROWD and Crayon. She is the recipient of a Saltonstall individual artist's grant and a MacDowell Colony residency and serves on the editorial board of How2: an Online Journal of Innovative Women's Poetics.


 
Jonathan Greene

Jonathan Greene is the author of 20 books, including most recently A Little Ink in the Paper Sea (Tangram, 2001), Book of Correspondences (tel-let, 2002), and Watching Dewdrops Fall (Mountains & Rivers Press, 2003). His forthcoming book, correspondence with Thomas Merton, will be published by the University of Kentucky Library Press. Greene has received fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, the Southern Federation of State Arts Agencies, and the Kentucky Arts Council. Since 1965 he has edited and published books by Robert Duncan, Wendell Berry, Cid Corman, Jonathan Williams, Robert Morgan, amongst others, under the Gnomon Press imprint.


 
Paul G. Hayes

Paul G. Hayes reported for The Milwaukee Journal and its Sunday magazine, Wisconsin, from 1962 until his retirement in 1995. As a daily reporter he specialized in environment, energy, and the natural sciences. As a magazine writer he wrote about outstanding Wisconsinites. His honors include the Richard S. Davis award, the Gordon MacQuarrie medal, and two Westinghouse Science Writing Awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters and serves on the boards of the Academy and the Ice Age Park and Trail Foundation.


 
Michael Heller

Michael Heller is a poet, essayist and critic. His most recent volume of poetry is Exigent Futures: New and Selected Poems (Salt Publishing, 2003). Among his books are Conviction's Net of Branches, In the Builded Place, Wordflow and Living Root: A Memoir. He wrote the libretto for the recently performed opera, Benjamin, based on the life of Walter Benjamin. His poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies including The Paris Review, Conjunctions, Harpers, New Letters, The Nation, American Poetry Review, Pequod, The New York Times Book Review, Parnassus: Poetry in Review, and many others. His awards include the NEH Poet/Scholar grant, the Di Castagnola Prize and New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships. He has been a member of the faculty of NYU's American Language Institute since 1967 and has taught at The Naropa Institute, The New School, San Francisco State, Notre Dame and other universities. He was born in 1937 in New York City, where he now lives.


 
Kimberly Howey

Kimberly Howey began researching Lorine Niedecker as a postgraduate student at the University of London King's College. Having also studied at Brigham Young University, she researched the Utah-native poet May Swenson and presented her Swenson thesis to the British Association of American Studies. She has freelanced for city and national magazines, and currently teaches writing at her local college in Nevada.


 
Jonathan Ivry

Jonathan Ivry is an assistant professor of English at University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. He received his Ph.D. in English and Humanities from Stanford University in 2000 with a dissertation on recursive structures in American poetry that included a chapter on Louis Zukofsky (though not, alas, on Niedecker)! After teaching at UW-Madison for three years as a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of English, he is delighted to be currently employed at a university that is a mere 10 miles from Black Hawk Island, though he is dismayed that so few of his Wisconsin students have ever heard of Lorine Niedecker. He has published an essay on Wallace Stevens and "messianic time" and is working on a book that examines the relationship of Stevens to postmodern, experimental poetry. Jonathan lives in Madison with his wife, Simone Schweber, and their two children, and he enjoys canoeing on the Rock River with his friend and colleague, poet Patrick Moran."


 
Lisa Jarnot

Lisa Jarnot was born in 1967 in Buffalo, New York. She attended State University of New York at Buffalo and Brown University. She has been the editor of two small poetry magazines: No Trees and Troubled Surfer. She was also editor of St. Mark's Newsletter until 1997. Touted as one of the finest young poets in the United States, she is the author of Some Other Kind of Mission (Burning Deck Press, 1996), which was mentioned by John Ashbery in The Times Literary Supplement International Books of the Year, as well as the much anticipated Ring of Fire (Zoland Books, 2001). She has taught at the Naropa Institute's Jack Kerouac School for Disembodied Poetics, and is currently working on a biography of Robert Duncan.

"The humor and wit and compassion of her work is entirely inviting: she leads us into wild gardens, parklands, jungles of words, peopled by hyperreal aardvarks and tapirs and roamers of the city night. Here, inferno, purgatory, and paradise are not hierarchical or judgmental, but simultaneous and coexistent, and the organ music of Jarnot's lines wakes us up to our world in the way only great art is able to do."
--Anselm Hollo


 
John Lehman

John Lehman is the founder and first publisher of Rosebud. He is also the poetry editor of the Wisconsin Academy Review as well as managing partner of Zelda Wilde Publishing and editor/publisher of the free Madison street-quarterly Cup of Poems with a Side of Prose. His latest collection of poetry is Dogs Dream of Running. At this conference he is pleased to be premiering his latest book, America's Greatest Unknown Poet, Lorine Niedecker in Letters, Reminiscences, Photographs and Poems.


 
Amy Lutzke

Amy Lutzke has been Assistant Director of the Dwight Foster Public Library since 1998. She is also the reference librarian, adult program coordinator, and Web mistress. She loves being involved in a variety of projects which is why this is her dream job. For the first few years of her job she knew very little about Lorine Niedecker but, since she sat across from Lorine's picture every day, she decided she better learn more. She now hopes to assist in making Lorine Niedecker as well known in Wisconsin as Laura Ingalls Wilder.


 
Richard Meier

Richard Meier's first book of poetry, Terrain Vague, was selected by Tomaz Salamun as winner of the 2000 Verse Prize. His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Conduit, Fence, American Letters and Commentary, Paris Review, and other journals. He has worked as poet-in-the-schools with Teachers & Writers Collaborative in New York City and with Gateway to the Arts in Pittsburgh. He has taught creative writing at the Universities of Alabama and Pittsburgh and is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Beloit College.


 
Peter Middleton

Peter Middleton was born in 1950 and grew up in both England and the United States. He studied at the universities of Oxford, Sheffield, and SUNY Buffalo. He is the author of a book on masculinity, The Inward Gaze (1992) and Literatures of Memory: History, Time and Space in Postwar Writing (2000), which he co-wrote with Tim Woods. A book of essays on performance, readership, and consumption in contemporary poetry is forthcoming, and Salt Press has just published a book of his poems, Aftermath. He teaches English at the University of Southampton.


 
Maureen Owen

Maureen Owen, an Irish American from Minnesota, now of Denver, Colorado, edited Telephone Books and Telephone magazine through thirty titles of the press and nineteen issues of the magazine to date. She received a Poetry Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and was awarded a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc. in 1999. She has worked as Program Coordinator at the St. Mark's Poetry Project in NY and served on the Board of the Poetry Project and the Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines—both as a member and as a vice-chairperson. She has taught a number of creative writing workshops including St. Mark's Poetry Project, was a full professor of Creative Writing at Edinboro University, Edinboro, Pennsylvania Fall of 1999/2000. She is now teaching at The Naropa Institute.


 
Michael Ondaatje

Michael Ondaatje was bork in Sri Lanka and has lived in Canada since 1963. His works include The Converations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film, Anil's Ghost, The English Patient, In the Skin of a Lion, Coming Through Slaughter, The Collected Works of Billy the Kid, and his memoir, Running in the Family. During his career Ondaatje has received numerous awards and honors. He was the recipient of the Canadian Governor-General's Award for Literature in 1971 and again in 1980. In 1980 he was also awarded the Canada-Australia price and in 1992 he was presented with the Booker McConnell Prize for his novel The English Patient. He has made two documentary films: Sons of Captain Poetry (on the poet bp Nichol) and The Clinton Special (about Theatre Passe Muraille's The Farm Show)—available from Mongrel Media September 2003 (Three short films by Michael Ondaadje).


 
Jenny Penberthy

Jenny Penberthy lives in Vancouver, where she teaches, writes, and raises a family. Her study of Lorine Niedecker has been a steady commitment for over twenty years. Her meticulous and insightful (inciteful) attention to LN's poetics makes her preeminent among Niedecker scholars. Her most recent work Lorine Niedecker Collected Works (2002) was published by the University of California Press. Other titles include Niedecker and the Correspondence with Zukofsky, 1931—1970, and Lorine Niedecker Woman and Poet, both edited by Penberthy.


 
Mary Pinard

Mary Pinard is a poet and associate professor of English at Babson College, where she directs and teaches in the Undergraduate Rhetoric Program. She holds graduate degrees in English from the University of Chicago and in poetry from Vermont College. Her poems have appeared in a range of literary magazines, including Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Poetry East, and The Nebraska Review. She has been a fan of Lorine Niedecker for many years and has written articles celebrating Niedecker's work, in particular its response to her beloved riverine environment.


 
Patrick Pritchett

Patrick Pritchett is the author of Ark Dive, (Arcturus Editions), and Reside (Dead Metaphor Press). His poems have appeared in New American Writing, Rhizome, River City, Mirage, Antenym, Bombay Gin, non, and Prairie Schooner, among others. He is a contributing editor to Facture and a member of the mysterious School of Continuation.



 
Meredith Quartermain

Meredith Quartermain has published and read in Canada, the U.S. and Britain. Books and chapbooks include Terms of Sale (Meow 1996), Spatial Relations (Diaeresis 2001), A Thousand Mornings (Nomados 2002) and The Eye-Shift of Surface (greenboathouse 2003). With Robin Blaser, she recently completed a series of poems, entitled Wanders (Nomados 2002). In Fall 2002, ecopoetics published some of her long poem Matter (now forthcoming from Chax, Fall 2003). Her work has also appeared in Matrix, Queen Street Quarterly, The Capilano Review, West Coast Line, Raddle Moon, Five Fingers Review, Chain, Sulfur, Tinfish, Potepoetzine, East Village Poetry Web, Jacket, Goodfoot, and other magazines.


 
Peter Quartermain

Peter Quartermain taught contemporary poetry and poetics at the University of British Columbia for over thirty years; was Mountjoy Fellow, University of Durham (1990); was Resident Fellow, Bellagio Conference Centre, Italy (1997); received a Killam Research Prize University of BC,1997); and taught at Naropa (2002). He has written or edited numerous articles and several books, including Basil Bunting: Poet of the North (1990) and Disjunctive Poetics (1992); with the English poet Richard Caddel he edited Other: British and Irish Poetry Since 1970 (1999), and, with Rachel Blau DuPlessis, The Objectivist Nexus: Essays in Cultural Poetics (1999). He is currently writing his autobigraphy Where I Lived and What I Learned There: Part I: Growing Dumb.

With his wife Meredith, he ran Slug Press (1980-97), producing hand-set letter-press poetry broadsides by Helen Adam, Charles Bernstein, Robin Blaser, George Bowering, Richard Caddel, Robert Creeley, James Laughlin, Daphne Marlatt, Michael McClure, bpNichol, Sharon Thesen, Fred Wah, Phyllis Webb, Jonathan Williams, Louis Zukofsky and others. Currently they run Keefer Street Press, and Nomados Literary Publishers.


 
Lisa Robertson

Lisa Robertson is a member of the Kootenay School of Writing, a group of energetic young poets who collectively changed the face of Western Canadian writing beginning in the 1980s. She co-edits the poetry journal Raddle Moon with Susan Clark in Vancouver. In her spare time, she tells her American fans, Lisa visits scrap yards and trains large dogs. Her books and chapbooks include The Apothecary (Tsunami 1991), XEclogue (Tsunami 1993; rev. New Star 1999), The Badge (The Berkeley Horse/ Mindware 1994), The Descent (Meow 1996), Debbie: an epic (New Star 1997) and Soft Architecture: A Manifesto (Artspeak/Dazibao 1999). Her recent poetry and criticism appears in American Book Review, Big Allis, Boundary2, Mix, Nest: a magazine of interiors, Raddle Moon, Sulphur, Stand and West Coast Line.


 
Elizabeth Robinson

Elizabeth Robinson coedits EtherDome Press with Colleen Lookingbill, and is coeditor of a new magazine, 26, as well as Instance Press. Fanny Howe selected her book, Pure Descent, for the National Poetry Series, 2001, which will eventually be published by Sun & Moon Press. Robert Creeley selected her work to appear in the Best American Poetry of 2002. Her poetry is widely considered to represent the best in lyric abstraction and physicality of language. Robinson lives in Berkeley.

"Among the sources for the word 'contemplation' are: 'an open place for observation marked out by the augur with his staff' and 'to stand in the dwelling place of the diety.' Both describe the work of Elizabeth Robinson, which, of the poets in her generation, most actively pursues belief as a central issue."
—Paul Hoover


 
Lisa Samuels

Lisa Samuels has a PhD from the University of Virginia with a dissertation on Wallace Stevens and Laura Riding. She publishes on Riding and other modernist and contemporary poets as well as on subjects such as poetic beauty, intellectual property and modes of poetic analysis. Her book, Seven Voices, was published by O Books in 1998 and she continues to publish widely in literary journals. Samuels teaches creative writing and literature at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.


 
Eleni Sikelianos

Eleni Sikelianos is the author of The Book of Tendons, The Lover's Numbers, and To Speak While Dreaming. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative American Writing, and the James D. Phelan Award for Blue Guide. Sikelianos was featured in the Glamour magazine article, "Women Are Making Poetry Hot Again," and her work has appeared in numerous journals and magazines, including Grand Street, Fence, The Chicago Review, and Sulfur.


 
Jonathan Skinner

Jonathan Skinner, who hails from New Mexico, edits and publishes ecopoetics in Buffalo, NY where he misidentifies birds along the Niagara River and is currently completing a dissertation on "environ-mental contact in postmodern poetry" for the SUNY Buffalo English Department. His essays, reviews, translations and poems have appeared in in numerous publications, including Buffalo Vortex, Circulars, Elevator, Gare du Nord, Jacket, Kenning, Kiosk, Lagniappe, La Main de Singe, Sibila, The Gig, The Poetry Project Newsletter and Verdure; his chapbooks include Political Cactus Poems (Periplum Editions) and Little Dictionary of Sounds (RedDLines).


 
Stacy Szymaszek

Stacy Szymaszek is the author of the fine press broadside Three Poems (Heavy Duty Press, 2000) and the chapbook Survival. She coedits the literary journal Traverse and coedited an anthology of avant garde Milwaukee writing called Oranges Hung. Recently, she has led a discussion group on poetry and politics at Woodland Pattern, given a talk on concrete poetry at Beloit College and performed her poem "loomings, a bosom friend" at the Tingle Review. She holds the esteemed position of literary coordinator at Woodland Pattern.


 
Harriet Tarlo

Harriet Tarlo (BA, Ph.D) teaches Creative Writing and English at the University of Leeds, UK. Her interest in Niedecker stems from her creative and critical interests in poetry; Modernism; Feminist Theory and poetry and environment/landscape. She wrote two essays on Niedecker in the 1990s, one for the journal Fragmente and the other for Kicking Daffodils: Twentieth-Century Women Poets, Edinburgh University Press, 1997. Recent academic publications include "Radical British Landscape Poetry in the Bunting Tradition", The Star You Steer By: Basil Bunting and British Modernism, ed. R. Price and J. McGonigal, Editions Rodopi, 2000 and "'A she even smaller than a me': gender dramas of the contemporary avant-garde", Contemporary Women's Poetry: Reading/Writing/Practice, Macmillan/St Martin's Press, 2000. Recent poetry publications include Love/Land, Rem Press, 2003, and a selection in Foil: defining poetry 1985-2000, ed. Nicholas Johnson, etrsucan books, 2000. She is currently working on a new volume of poetry, Nab (selections of which can be found in the latest Electronic Poetry Review), and co-editing a book on British Environmentalism for the University of Virginia Press.


 
Steve Timm

Steve Timm teaches English as a second language at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. His poetry has shown up recently (and/or soon-to-be-so) in a wide variety of places, including American Letters & Commentary, Word For/Word, Castagraf, Moria, Skanky Possum, Bird Dog, Antennae, 5Trope, and Aught. He played bassoon and poetry in the defunct band Dyna-Music.


 
Anne Waldman

Anne Waldman is the author of over 30 books and pamphlets of poetry, including Fast Speaking Woman (20th Anniversary, 1996), IOVIS, Books I and II (1993 and 1997), Marriage: A Sentence (2000), Vow to Poetry: Essays, Interviews and Manifestoes (2001) and Dark Arcana/Afterimage or Glow (2003). She is also the editor of numerous anthologies including The Beat Book (1999); and co-editor of The Angel Hair Anthology (2001). Her CDs include Alchemical Elegy (2001) and Battery: Live At Naropa (2003). She is an active member of the Naropa University Audio Archive Preservation and Access Project. With Ammiel Alcalay, she founded the activist coalition Poetry Is News, www.poetryisnews.org. Anne is co-founder of The Kerouac School, and Chair and Artistic Director of its Summer Writing Program. She has collaborated with many artists and musicians, and has performed her poetry world-wide.


 
Peter Whalen

Peter Whalen is Education Coordinator at Woodland Pattern Book Center. His poetry has appeared in Modern Haiku, Barrow Street, The Southeast Review, Reed, Free Verse, and Poetry Motel. His poetic series, The Mayan Way, currently available on audiotape, received an Academy of American Poets Award in 1993. In 2000 he earned a Ph.D. in English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he served as Editor-in-Chief of the Cream City Review. He's taught writing and literature at Mount Mary College, UW-Milwaukee, and Dominican High School, and middle school Spanish at Urban Day School of Milwaukee.


 
Elizabeth Willis

Elizabeth Willis is the author of three books of poetry. The Human Abstract (Penguin, 1995) was selected for the National Poetry Series, and Turneresque is just out from Burning Deck. Second Law, a booklength poem, was published by Avenue B in 1993. A fourth collection of poems and a critical work are currently under construction. Her essays on Niedecker have appeared in Xcp: Cross-cultural Poetics, American Poet, and How2. She grew up in Eau Claire and currently teaches at Wesleyan University.



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